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How to stop a heart attack, treat a heart ailment

A woman’s heart has stopped working, her brain has stopped functioning, and her kidneys have stopped functioning.

The condition has left her paralyzed from the waist down.

She can’t do much but stare at a black screen.

The problem was discovered after she went into cardiac arrest in October, while she was working at a mall in Chennai.

A team of doctors who have spent nearly a month examining her and performing life-saving surgeries performed by the Centre for Advanced Studies (CAS) and the Heart Institute at Hyderabad University said they were unable to identify a cause of the cardiac arrest.

The heart has a lot of pressure, and it’s very difficult to relax.

I have to have my chest open to breathe, and the pressure of my chest is so strong that my heart cannot relax.

As a result, my heart muscle does not function properly and I have no breath,” she said.

Her life was saved when she was able to undergo surgery at a hospital in Hyderabad.”

She had gone into cardiac collapse on the way to the hospital.

She was unable to breathe.

She had a cardiac scan done, and she was diagnosed with acute ventricular tachycardia, a condition that can lead to cardiac arrest,” Dr R.V. Bajpai, director, cardiac surgery, the Heart and Lung Institute, said.

The condition has now been confirmed as acute ventricle.

The hospital team had treated the woman for acute ventillatory failure (AVD) when she arrived at the hospital in October.

She recovered and was discharged on September 15, Dr Bajpee said.

In a separate case, a man from Mumbai, who was admitted to the same hospital in September, succumbed to cardiac arrhythmia.

He had been admitted for cardiac arrhoea after an emergency visit to the ICU.”

We found him unconscious on the bed, and we had to save his life by resuscitating him.

He was transferred to our intensive care unit in Chennai, where he succumbed to acute ventilatory failure,” Dr Biju Bhagat, director of the ICF hospital, said in a statement.

Dr Vijay Gupta, a cardiac surgeon and head of the Chennai-based Cardiac Institute of India, said the problem of acute ventolary disease is increasing in India, with more than two million people living with the condition.””

I have seen many cases of cardiac arrest, where the heart stopped functioning and the patient was helpless and unable to do anything,” he said.

Dr Vijay Gupta, a cardiac surgeon and head of the Chennai-based Cardiac Institute of India, said the problem of acute ventolary disease is increasing in India, with more than two million people living with the condition.

“There are a lot more cases of AVD in Chennai now than in years past.

We have to be on guard.

This is a serious problem and it is not going to go away any time soon,” he added.