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‘I’m so thankful’: Former NFL star and doctor tells CBS’ The Early Show that he is thankful to have found a ‘better way’ to live his life

HEAVEN, Ohio — A former NFL star who died of a heart defect while working as a personal trainer says he is so thankful he found a “better way” to live.

In an exclusive interview with The Early, Dr. Brian Miller, the former San Francisco 49ers running back and orthopedic surgeon, shared his journey to find a way to live the rest of his life.

He described his recovery from the surgery as a journey of “hope and optimism” and said the experience has been a “game changer.”

“I have never felt so blessed as I do now to be able to go back and have a new outlook on life,” Miller said.

“It is a blessing that my kids and grandkids will have a chance to see how I lived and how I got along.

I think it’s something that I learned from my dad who was a physician and a surgeon and that you have to be in the trenches and you have a lot of things that you work on in your mind, but you have also to keep working on them.” “

I’ve always been a perfectionist.

I think it’s something that I learned from my dad who was a physician and a surgeon and that you have to be in the trenches and you have a lot of things that you work on in your mind, but you have also to keep working on them.”

Miller said his father, a renowned orthopedist, told him when he retired, “It’s not the time to go on a vacation.

You’ve got to do it now.”

Miller, who retired as a doctor at the age of 49, began working as an orthopedian at age 23, after graduating from the University of Virginia.

He earned his doctorate in orthopedics from the College of William and Mary.

“The surgery was not a big deal,” he said.

He went to work for the team that drafted him, the San Francisco Raiders, and spent two years working at a medical clinic in Houston, Texas.

“After I was done with that, I had two surgeries,” he told CBS’ “The Early Show.”

“One was a big one on my right foot, which was a double-thickness operation on the tendon, and then a second one on the right ankle, which is a full thickness surgery.

I had surgery on the ankle that was on my other leg.” “

Then I had to have a second surgery on my left knee, which involved removing the entire ligament in my right knee.

I had surgery on the ankle that was on my other leg.”

Miller was a two-time Pro Bowler for the 49ers and a three-time All-Pro with the team.

He played for the Raiders, Philadelphia Eagles and the Denver Broncos.

His first knee surgery, in 2007, was performed at the University, where he was a star linebacker.

He had knee problems since high school and suffered a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and torn meniscus in his right knee, a serious injury that required a reconstruction of his ACL.

In 2009, Miller was diagnosed with a type of heart defect.

The heart defect can result in blood clots that can lead to sudden death or stroke.

“When I was diagnosed, I was going through a very difficult time,” Miller told CBS.

“My family and I were living in a hotel, and I was in a car, driving to the hospital.

And the ambulance was there, but the doctor told me to leave it in the garage.

We’ll go over this and we’ll take care of you.’ “

When the doctor called me, he said, ‘I think you might have a heart condition.

And then he had a heart surgeon who went through my medical history, and they diagnosed me with a heart failure. “

The doctor took me to the orthopedists, the medical doctors, the specialists.

I’m out.’ “

And I was like, ‘Well, this is it.

This is not going to get better, not with this procedure.’ “

And the orthopaedic surgeon was like: ‘You’ve got a heart disease, Brian.

This is not going to get better, not with this procedure.’

And he was very supportive, and the ortho surgeon said, “Well, we’ll just have to get this done.

You’re going to have to do this surgery.

“Miller had surgery to remove the ACL and repaired the meniscis in his left knee.

“But it was not until the middle of June that I actually got to see my daughter, who was five years old at the time, and my wife, who is in her 30s, and a few other family members.” “

As soon as I got home, I knew that I had a chance,” he recalled.

“But it was not until the middle of June that I actually got to see my daughter, who was five years old at the time, and my wife, who is in her 30s, and a few other family members.”

Miller says the surgery went well and